Piranesi, creator of the Roman iconograpy

piranesi

Under the title Piranesi, Rembrandt of the Ruins, the Casa di Goethe in Rome hosts an exhibition of the engraver Giovanni Battista Piranesi, who lived and worked from 1720 to 1778. The Piranesi exhibition gives an excellent insight into what Rome must have looked like in the days of Goethe and focuses especially on his work “Vedute di Roma” (Views of Rome), which is represented with 35 reprints. The artist had depicted the ancient and classical monuments of the Eternal City in 135 sheets.The decay of the Roman ruins facilitates their placement in the surrounding landscape. Piranesi presents them as overgrown, inhabited by phantasmagoric figures and, at the same time, plunged into air and light.

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Piranesi influenced Romanticism and Surrealism by his way to represent his engraving, much more than a neoclassic artist.

During the exhibition Goethe House presents for the first time a major permanent loan to Rechburg and Betzkoj Associates (RB), a pen drawing of 1787 attributed to JW Goethe, newly discovered, depicting a landscape with Italian monastery.