Feb
27
2014
0

SKUNK ANANSIE IN ROME

Skunk Anansie are an English band, whose image is generally associated with the singer and band-leader Skin (Deborah Dyer), known among other things for his habit of wearing her hair completely shaved.

After the success of the summer tour, which saw them dominate the stage of the peninsula from north to south, the tireless SKUNK ANANSIE return to Italy-19 of march here in rome.

A brand new adventure for Skunk Anansie, yet another - in the nearly twenty years of career - the overwhelming challenge for rock band led by Skins, creator of this acoustic tour, started with an argument than the “confidence” that the singer has with the his voice: Many singers do not like my voice, and somehow I am also very insecure and I am afraid to expose my voice without being accompanied by a sound. I asked myself, ok I can sing loud, but I could do it equally singing plan? “

The Italian tour will therefore be a new step in this adventure Acoustic unusual for listeners, and also for the rock band “The perspective is different when sitting on the stage and you need to focus a lot on his own music. (….) meet again during the show in London made ​​us realize how everything was so fresh and vital energy and enthusiasm impossible to forge. we are proud of every album we made, but this acoustic experience is really something special.

Feb
06
2014
0

Rome: The City of Seven Hills

ForoRome, over the last two thousand years, became center of power, wealth and religion. At its highest peak, the Roman Empire extended Scotland to North Africa and Israel to England. And at the end of the day, the Roman Catholic state is reaching billions of followers across the globe.

Rich families, consulates and/or religious figures hired artists or architects to personalise their villas with statutes, gardens, thermae, theatre, temples, libraries and so on. The Roman Catholic hegemony, for example, hired artistes like Michaelangelo to paint the Last Super and Sistine Chapel. No wander, the rich families and the powerfull did the same.

Obsession to family interest, power and a luxurious life style often engulfed governors, generals, cardinals, popes and rich at odds against each other. This kind of selfish and controversial life style was also wide spread in the peninsula.

Rome owes its architecture, art, history and might; either to those who trampled the poor or to those who used religion to further their apetite to power, money or religious ambitions.

In a ‘modernised and civilized’ Rome, nothing seems to have changed except that now all the hassle is in a more fashionable and refined way.

Yet, Rome is worth watching.


Adu K


Nov
19
2013
0

Christmas in Rome: 5 things we love

pandoro
1.- The Pincio Christmas tree
Il Pincio, the terrace overlooking the city from Piazza del Popolom  is one of our favorite spots in Rome, and with a huge Cristmas tree it becomes a memorable postcard to send home.

2.- The Piazza Navona Christmas Market

Candy, puppets, a merry-go-round. No matter where you come from, this little market will bring back all the Christmas memories from you childhood.

3.- The Christmas scene at the Vatican

Italy takes pride on its nativity scenes, and the most important in Rome is the one that the Holy See sets at Saint Peter’s square

4.- Panettone and Pandoro

For us this is more reliable than most personality tests. There’s no middle ground:you are either a Panettone person or a Pandoro person. These are 2 types of bread commonly associated with Christmas: Panettone  contains candied orange, citron, and lemon zest;: Pandoro does not contain candied fruits but is covered with deliclious  vanilla-scented icing sugar.

5.- Roasted chestnuts street vendors

We don’t like chesnuts but we love to see the vendors on the street. Winter wouldn’t be the same without them.

If you are planning to spend Christmas in Rome, you best option for accomodation are Yes Hotel and Hotel Des Artistes. Just check our websites or send us a line to get the best rate available.

Nov
14
2013
0

Villa of The Quintilii

villaquintiliiromeVilla Quintilii, located in the Appia Antica surrounding, was constructed in 151 AD by Sextus Quintilius Maximus and Sextus Quintilius Condianus, who were successfull consuls in the 2nd century. Nevertheless, the earliest construction of the villa dates back to the Hadrian rule.

The end of the once influential consul brothers was so sad. It is said, Emperor Commodus so coveted the villa, may be due its location or magnificence, and killed (182 AD) the Quintilii bros and automatically became the heir.

Villa Quintilii was discoverded in 1776 by Gavin Hamilton, in what the locals commonly call  Roma Vecchia for after the villa was first excavated, it looked like a small city in itself. This houses extensive thermae with its own water supply system and amazingly a horse race course (dating to the fourth century).

Now, the villa (a state property since 1989) has a museum that houses the marbles and other materials which were used to adorn the villa. In 1784 the villa has to it added a terrace, which give a good view of the Castelli Romani.



Adu K

Aug
03
2013
0

A Sumer Along the Tiber River

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Every year during August  a small market is set on both sides of the Tiber river: there you can eat the very Roman porchetta, buy the products of many local artisans, attend a street-theatre performance and have dinner too!

All in all a very good option to spend an evening in Rome after a long (and hot) day of sightseeing. The manifestation takes place along the river, beetwen the Sisto and Garibaldi bridges; the area can be easily reached from Hotel Des Artistes or Yes Hotel Rome taking the bus H from the station Termini (get off the first stop after the bridge).

Mar
14
2013
0

Rome Welcomes Pope Francis

Il nuovo Papa Jorge Mario Bergoglio con il nome di Francesco I

So, we finally have a Pope.

The world was surprised to learn the election was so quick, but was even more surprised to learn that the new pope – who will go under the name Francesco, or Francis in English- was Jorge Mario Bergoglio, archbishop of Buenos Aires, who wasn’t included in any of the preliminary lists made by Vatican experts and probability whizzes at the gambling companies around the world. As the  Roman saying  goes, whoever enters the conclave as a pope, leaves as a cardinal.

With hindsight, the election of archbishop Bergoglio, who will become the first pope to arrive from outside Europe, is a smart one. An austere man who chose his papal name inspired by Saint Francis of Assisi, he is sure to bring warmth and vigour to the church he is called to lead, that without mentioning the immense reserve of devotion and support he will find in Latin America, where the majority of the population is catholic.

Next Sunday, Pope Francis will offer his first Angelus, the public blessing the pope offers every week at noon. It will be a great opportunity to be part of a historical event! If you need help with your accomodation in Rome, don’t hesitate to contact us, or check our website to get the  best rates in the Eternal City!

Dec
18
2012
0

Christmas cakes: Panettone and Pandoro

Christmas indexis approaching and preparations for the Christmas dinner or lunch is important to every Italian family.

Typical cakes Panettone and Pandoro are Very important on Italian tables.

For Italians, the Cakes symbolize Christmas and this special day with out such cakes is like thanksgiving day with out Turkey.

The legend tells both were first made hundreds of years ago: Panettone in MilanPandoro_g

and Pandoro in Verona, but today you can not find a single Italian family, north to south, which does not end lunch or dinner festivities with these delicacies.

But what is the difference between Panettone and Pandoro?

The difference is mainly in the ingredients (in panettone there are more eggs and especially there are candied fruit and raisins) but also in the type of machining and rising time. Panettone is done strictly with the yeast base while the Pandoro can be maid also with the brewer’s yeast. Panettone must also rise for about 2-3 days while the Pandoro for 18 up to 36 hours.


Our Blogger: Rhodora

Written by NIC81 in: Holidays in Rome |
Dec
14
2012
0

Appian Way (Appia Antica)

Appia AnticaThe Romans wanted to defeat every enemy that stood on their path hindering the empire’s growth and roads were built to achieve the end. Roads played significant role in moving armies, supplies, reinforcement, trade, power and wealth.

Appian way, which connects Rome to south Italy, was one of the main roads Romans desperately needed.

Appius Claudius, Roman censor, constructed dirt road with stones and mortar stretching from Rome to Capua for 200km. Part of the road was started and finished in 312 BC. The Appian to date has the longest straight road in Europe (64 km).

To mention few of the important historical events that happened on this road:

In the 71 BC, 6000 slaves were slain by the Romans after their revolt ended in defeat at the hands of the Roman Army. In the WWII, Allied Forces landed at Nettuno to capture Rome penetrating through Appian way but the Germans resisted until their defeat in 1944. And Abebe Bekila won 1960 summer olympics, that passed through this way.

Long kilometers of the Appian way are now open to the public for walking, jogging, bicycling etc.

The following monuments are found along the Appian way: Baths of Caracalla (at the start), catacomb of San Callisto and a small church (chiesa del Domine Quo Vadis) on Via Ardeatina a street that branches off Appian Way.




Adu K

Nov
26
2012
0

Villa D’Este Tivoli

Villa D'Este TivoliPopes or their families were involved in making expensive and impressive villas, arts or monuments for power and family prestige, now these structures account to a great deal of income.

Villa D’Este is no different story, in-fact this is byproduct of Roman Catholic priests’ luxurious and competitive life style.

Pope Julius III elevated Cardinal Ippolito II D’Este, grandson of Pope Alexander VI, to governor of Tivoli (north east of Rome) in 1550.

As a result of his new assignment, the cardinal was given an old monastery. Not satisfied with the new office, Ippolito, called famous architects, engineers and painters of that time to change an unknown monastery to ‘gardening and water-play model’ across Europe.

In the process, Villa Adriana marbles and statues were dismantled by the orders of the cardinal to making his own villa better.

The late-Renaissance villa stayed on D’Este family until the 18th C. when Maria Beatrice (daughter of Ercole II D’Este) married Duke Ferdinand of Habsburg, and automatically the villa became a Habsburg property.

As other Roman villas fate, the D’Este fell in disrepair and was neglected till the Italian State bought and restored it after the end of first world war. It is now open to the public

Villa D’Este became UNESCO world Heritage Site in 2001.




Adu K

Nov
23
2012
0

Villa Adriana Tivoli

villa AdrianaVilla Adriana, a UNESCO Heritage Site since 1999, continues to marvel generations that come to pass 20 centuries after it was built. On return from Egypt & Greece, Emperor Hadrian decided to make a retreat villa (from the chaotic city of Rome) similar to the architecture and worship that he learnt in the eastern section of his empire.

At the end of his reign, Hadrian had his quarters in this impressive villa of 1 sq km. There were various edifices including theatres, Greek and Latin libraries, two bathhouses, formal gardens with fountains, statues, pools, underground for servants, extensive housing for guests and the palace staff.

Today, the villa located 25 km north east of Rome, is nothing but ruins of what was once the glamour of its time.

Little remains of the original villa, because materials were reused to make Villa D’Este in the area, looted by barbarians or civilians and neglected for centuries. Though,16th century excavations brought to life parts of the villa, still large section remains unearthed.

The various sections of the complex recovered in part are: Hall of Doric Pillars (basilica), Temple of Venus, Greek Theatre, Maritime Theatre (Hadrian’s small favorite island), Hall of Philosophers (library), Heliocaminus (baths), Nymphaeum Stadium, Poecile (large garden with swimming pool), Canopus (god Serapis sanctuary with 119 m long canal decorated with statues), Large and Small Thermae (hot & cold baths) and Piazza d’Oro (formal dinning room).



Adu K


Rome Hotel Des Artistes - Via Villafranca 20 00185 Rome Italy - Ph +39 064454365 Fax +39 064462368 - info@hoteldesartistes.com